Findings: Equipment Record

In creating the equipment record for the makerspace collection, it was important to look at a number of examples of equipment records. Reviewing records for laptops, kindles, photo equipment, etc. at the Essex High School/Center for Technology Library provided some useful information and a basic outline and model for creating makerspace equipment records. The rules set forth by Special Libraries Cataloging and the rules for realia cataloging as outlined by Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library were also instructive. The records were further crafted through use of the RDA Toolkit, and the Library of Congress Marc21 Format for Bibliographic Data. WebDewey and the Library of Congress Subject Headings guide were used for determining Dewey Decimal Classification and Subject Headings for the record.

The piece of equipment chosen as an example was an electronic cutting machine: the Silhouette CAMEO. This item works with a computer to enable the user to create designs and cut a variety of materials into shapes based on those designs. Information about the item was pulled from two sources, one being the Amazon.com record, and the other being the record on the manufacturer’s website. What follows is a summary of how determinations were made regarding the use of specific fields for this sample record:

Title Statement: The consensus among the equipment records that were reviewed seemed to be to record the name of the item only (i.e. “CAMEO Electronic Cutting Machine”), leaving the manufacturer information for the statement of responsibility field.

Statement of Responsibility and Production: Based on the recommendations of the Special Libraries Cataloging site, MARC field 264 was used rather than 260 for this information. The second indicator for this field was given as “3” in order to specify that the field would contain manufacturer information.

Standard Identifiers: As with the tool record, the Universal Product Code was chosen for this field. Other catalogers use the 024 field to record serial or model numbers but the goal in this instance was to create some uniformity among makerspace records and so the UPC seemed to be a number which all of the equipment and tools would have. Including the item’s model number or serial number was still important, however, and so in order to provide that information in a readily visible way for librarian use, the subfield “s” for “version” in the MARC title statement field was used.  In RDA, the model number was added to field 17.8 (Work Manifested) which includes the item name, the production information, and the model number.

Dewey Decimal Classification: It does not seem to be common practice to provide DDC classification for equipment, at least according to the example records and policy models that were reviewed for this project. However, working out a DDC number provided further clarification as to what the item is.  A question arose as to whether to look to DDC in the 7XX (arts & recreation) or to focus in on the item’s identity as a piece of equipment. Because the item would be residing in the library as a piece of equipment (as opposed to circulating throughout the school), the choice was made to use the following classification: 000 (Computer science, information & general works), 020 (Library and information sciences), 022 (Administration of physical plant), and 022.9 (Equipment, furniture, and furnishings). A case could be made for a 7XX classification which would match the sample tool record. But it seems that the most important thing is not so much that the tool and the equipment record match but that the records for all circulating items follow the same set of rules and the records for all non-circulating items follow the same set of rules.

Physical Description/Extent/Dimensions: The information for these fields was taken straight out of the manufacturer and distributor records as referenced earlier. Information about the specific materials which were used to fabricate the equipment was not included as this did not seem relevant, but rather information was limited to the specific items included in the equipment and the size of the equipment. This followed the models of Yale University, the SLC, and the EHS Library records.

Content/Media/Carrier Types: For RDA these were all “other” as no other classification here seemed to fit this particular item. For the MARC record, the rdacontent, rdamedia, and rdacarrier tables were used to specify the item as “three-dimensional form”, “other”, and “object”, respectively. In the case of this piece of equipment, media choice was somewhat tricky. The SLC site suggests using “unmediated” and “computer” for media type, but ultimately “other” was chosen in order to match to the 007/00 field which was “unspecified”.

General Notes/Summary: The Yale University and Special Libraries models only use the General Notes (500) fields, but the sample record created here, uses both a brief description (500) field and a full summary (520) field. The idea is to provide the user with a brief description on the initial search results page, but offer more detailed information should the user want to drill down into the record. The general note consists of a very brief description and the summary field gives the more detailed manufacturer’s description of the item. In RDA, the detailed description was entered into the “Nature of Content” field; no brief description was given.

Subject Headings: As this item is a tool or piece of equipment, the MARC field 655 was used to provide form information primarily. Secondarily, a subfield x was used to indicate that the equipment has to do with paper crafts.

Location and Local Information: Finally, a field was added to indicate that the item was part of the makerspace collection. Field 852 (Location) in MARC was used, and in RDA the text “Located in the makerspace” was added to the Nature of content field.  An 092 (Local call number) field was also added in the MARC record to provide the unique makerspace item call number.

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Findings: Tool Record

Cataloging a reusable makerspace tool which could be circulated outside of the makerspace and library poses a number of challenges. One challenge is that it is difficult to find other examples of records for crafting tools. The makerspace movement is still relatively new, and many libraries are not yet cataloging their makerspace collections even when they have them. A few records from the Easton Public Library for some die cutter tools provided some direction. However, for the most part, records had to be created through original cataloging, using the RDA Toolkit, and the Library of Congress Marc21 Format for Bibliographic Data. WebDewey and the Library of Congress Subject Headings guide were also used for determining Dewey Decimal Classification and Subject Headings for the record.

Working from the inventory list of an actual maker-space in a local high school (one which has not been cataloged yet), a macramé/project board was determined as the circulating tool exemplar. The idea was to think about a tool which students would be able to take home and work with on their own. This type of tool would need to be easily identifiable within the library catalog, so a major focus in creating the record, was to make sure that the record provided understandable and useful information about the tool and its uses (as opposed to more of an inventory-style record).

It was determined that these types of tools fell primarily into the category of “realia cataloging” which designation prescribed the related uses for the entries in the Leader and Fixed fields in MARC. When cataloging in actual practice, it is highly recommended that the item to be cataloged be physically present. The cataloger should have the opportunity to pull information directly from the item. For the purposes of this sample record, however, the information about the item was pulled from two sources, one being the Amazon.com record, and the other being the record on the manufacturer’s website. It is worthwhile to note that cataloging this type of item can be done without the physical presence of the item when necessary.

What follows is a breakdown of how certain fields were used in the sample record:

Title Statement: One of the first decisions that needed to be made, was what to call the item. Was it the “Beadsmith Macrame Board”? Or was it just the “Macrame Board.” The more generic name was chosen in order to leave room for the potential that additional macramé boards might be added to the collection and that they might come from different manufacturers. It seemed more practical to call them all “Macrame Boards” and then have the differentiating information located in other parts of the copy records, rather than creating completely new records for every different brand of board. Varying forms of the title were added as it is likely that users might search for “project board” or “bead board” in order to locate this item.

Statement of Responsibility and Production: The sample macramé board did actually have a designer’s name associated with it and so this information was entered in the statement of responsibility fields. The “Production” fields (2.7 – RDA and 264 – MARC) were then used to enter the name of the manufacturer or the brand for the tool.   These fields were chosen over the publisher fields as the item is the product of a manufacturing rather than a publication process.

Standard Identifiers: The Universal Product Code was chosen for use in this field. The reasoning was that while some makerspace tools might have serial numbers and others might have model numbers, they would all have UPCs and therefore that could be the uniform rule for what to enter in the identifier fields for all makerspace tools. That said, having a place for the model or serial number for these items was also important. A decision was made to include the model number in MARC within the title statement field. The subfield for “version” (subfield s) provides a space for “Name, code, or description of a copy of the described materials that was generated at different times or for different audiences.” (Marc 21 Format for Bibliographic Data) In RDA, the model number can be entered into field 17.8 (Work Manifested) which includes the item name, the production information, and the model number. In both cases, entering the information in these fields provides an “at-a-glance” field for librarians who want to quickly identify an item.

Dewey Decimal Classification: The DDC number broke down as, 700s (Arts & recreation), then 740 (Graphic arts & decorative arts), 746 (Textile arts), and then the added suffix of 028 for (Auxiliary techniques and procedures; apparatus, equipment, material).

Physical Description/Extent/Dimensions: The information for these fields was taken straight out of the manufacturer and distributor records as referenced earlier. In an ideal situation, the cataloger would also have the benefit of looking at/feeling the physical item when inputting information in these fields.

Content/Media/Carrier Types: For RDA these were all “other” as no other classification here seemed to fit this particular item. For the MARC record, rdacontent, rdamedia, and rdacarrier tables were used to specify the item as “three-dimensional form”, “unspecified”, and “object”, respectively.

General Notes/Summary: Entries for both the general note and the summary fields in MARC were created. This differs from other examples of equipment and tools records reviewed, however, the goal was to provide a very brief description of the tool (one that would likely appear on the initial page of the record in the OPAC), but also to give more detailed information should a patron wish to learn more about the tool. With this goal in mind, the general note gives a brief description and then the manufacturer’s more detailed description of the item was entered into the summary field. This is one place where the MARC and RDA records end up being a little bit different. There does not appear to be a satisfactory way to provide both kinds of descriptions in RDA, so instead the full description was entered into the “Nature of Content” field.

Subject Headings: As this item is a tool or piece of equipment, the index term field for genre/from was used (MARC field 655) rather than a subject access field, thus indicating that the item is equipment, as opposed to being about equipment. The main entry in this field is “Equipment”, designating the form, the topical term “textile crafts” from LCSH was then added in subfield x to match the Dewey classification of “textile arts.”

Location and Local Information: Finally, it was important to indicate in the record that this item was part of the makerspace collection. This was done first by providing an 852 (Location) field in MARC, and because this item is intended to circulate, an 092 (Local call number) field was also added to provide the unique makerspace item call number. In RDA, the added text “Located in the makerspace” was entered into the “Nature of Content” field; also the “Exemplar of a manifestation” field (17.11) was used for the unique call number.

Findings: Student Created Content Video Record

Consistent with a library’s role as a place of knowledge creation, not just of consumption, in a high school library makerspace, students create content. From apps to clothing, from robots to videos, teens love making any and everything imaginable (Graves, 2014). Collecting and sharing this student created content pose dilemmas and questions for school librarians. Which, if any, student created information objects will be collected? How will these items be classified and cataloged? How and where will these items be stored and retrieved?

The YouTube video, Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering (Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering, 2012) is an example of an information object about student created content.

Student created content necessitates the creation of original catalog records in most situations, and Maker Lab was no exception. The YouTube webpage of the video (Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering, 2012) provided much of the information contained in the record.  As many YouTube resources have been cataloged elsewhere, some of these records were examined from OCLC’s WorldCat (OCLC: Online Computer Library Center, 2014c) for comparison and guidance.

As necessary, reference was also made to the RDA Toolkit (American Library Association & Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA, 2010), CRS – Cataloger’s Reference Shelf (The Library Corporation, 2014) and Bibliographic Formats and Standards (OCLC: Online Computer Library Center, 2014a).

The creator of the video, Youth Radio, was not found in the LC Name Authority Headings (“Library of Congress Authorities,” 2014).  A 710 Added entry – Corporate name was included for Youth Radio.  The students appearing in the video were put in the record as 700 Added entry – Personal name fields.

Subject headings (“Library of Congress Subject Headings – LC Linked Data Service (Library of Congress),” 2014) for this video required quite careful consideration and also directly played into the Dewey classification.  Although the video is generally about Makerspaces, the specific primary subject here is High school libraries-activity programsMakerspaces is the type of activity program in this instance.

The complex High school libraries-activity programs subject as found in LCSH required investigation for the proper 650 Subject added entry – Topical term field format.  Subfield x, general subdivision, was used for activity programs after consulting CRS – Cataloger’s Reference Shelf, where a clear explanation was found, “650 subfield x is appropriate only when a general topical subdivision is added to a main term” (The Library Corporation, 2014).

With the primary subject established, the Dewey class was built in WebDewey (OCLC: Online Computer Library Center, 2014b):

020 Library & information sciences

026-027 Specific kinds of institutions

027 General libraries, archives, information centers

027.7-027.8 Libraries for educational institutions

027.8 School libraries

027.8223 Secondary level

 

References

Please see References page.

 

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Findings: User Manual Record

An equipment user manual was chosen both as an exemplar found in a makerspace and for its cataloging challenges.

From a practical standpoint, both students and instructors in a high school library makerspace clearly would benefit from regular access to such items included in the searchable library catalog. Unlike books, however, product or equipment user manuals present cataloging obstacles, among them: frequent lack of an ISBN or other standard identifier, missing date or edition information, or no author(s) identified. Also significantly, manuals often have no catalog records available for reference comparison, so copy cataloging is impossible.

This was precisely the case with the MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer User Manual, so an original record was built. While OCLC’s WorldCat had an entry (“MakerBot Replicator desktop 3D printer user manual. (Book, 2014) [WorldCat.org],” 2014), no record for the item exists in any of its member libraries. Though the item has both a print and digital manifestation, the sample record was created only for the accessible PDF online resource (MakerBot Industries, LLC, 2014). The print version was not available to the cataloger in this project.

The OCLC WorldCat entry had limited information, but did identify two appropriate subject headings. One of them, MakerBot Replicator, is not a Library of Congress Subject Heading (LCSH). Nonetheless, it appears in the record, deferring to the expertise of OCLC as sufficiently authoritative.

The online PDF provided the bulk of the information required for the record.  As necessary, reference was also made to the RDA Toolkit (American Library Association & Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA, 2010), CRS – Cataloger’s Reference Shelf (The Library Corporation, 2014) and Bibliographic Formats and Standards (OCLC: Online Computer Library Center, 2014a).  Particularly useful were RDA Code List tables found in CRS – Cataloger’s Reference Shelf, as in the 336 field example shown here:

Screen Shot 2014-11-23 at 3.34.40 PM

Click on image for originating page.

Library of Congress Authorities (“Library of Congress Authorities,” 2014) were also consulted. The corporate name MakerBot Industries, LLC was not found in the LC Name Authority Headings. This will likely also be the case for some corporate names associated with other user manual / instructions items.  For this record, a 110 Main Entry – Corporate Name field was not used after considerable weighing back and forth whether or not doing so was appropriate.  Best clarification on this question came in detail found at the Penn State University Libraries Bibliographic Processing Cataloging Rules, which cautions, “when in doubt do not make the corporate body a main entry” (Penn State University Libraries, 2014).  So with some doubt still remaining and the lack of an LC Name, the 110 field was dropped and a 710 Added Entry – Corporate Name included.

The primary subject heading, three-dimensional printing, emerged nearly verbatim from the title of the manual. Dewey classification, 681.62, was quite straightforward and confirmed by examining records for other materials with a primary subject heading of three-dimensional printing.

References

Please see References page.

 

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BeadSmith Macrame/Project Board

RDA elements 

RDA REF RDA ELEMENT DATA RECORDED
2.3.2 Title proper Macramé board
2.3.6 Variant title Project board
2.3.6 Variant title Bead board
2.4.2 Statement of responsibility relating to title proper designed by Anne Dilker from the BeadSmith
2.7 Production statement Carteret, NJ : The BeadSmith, n.d.
2.11 Copyright date unknown
2.13 Mode of issuance single unit
2.15 Identifier for the manifestation [UPC]
3.2 Media type other
3.3 Carrier type other
3.4 Extent 1 macramé board
3.5 Dimensions 11.5 X 15.5 in.
6.9 Content type other
7.2 Nature of the content Macramé /project board is made of synthetic material which will not be damaged by pins.   The board has notches on all sides to hold cords securely in place; ideal for macramé, Shambhala bracelets, decorative knotting and beading, etc. [from the Beadsmith website] Located in the makerspace.
17.8 Work manifested Macramé board / manufactured by The BeadSmith — Model number: MWB20
17.11 Exemplar of a manifestation M 746.028

Encoded in the MARC 21 format for bibliographic data, using ISBD punctuation

 

MARC FIELD TAG MARC FIELD INDICATORS DATA RECORDED
Leader/06 Type of record r
Leader/07 Bibliographic level m
Leader/18 Descriptive cataloguing form i
Leader/19 Multipart resource record level #
007/00 Physical description fixed field – Category of material z
007/01 Physical description fixed field – Specific material designation z
024 Other standard identifier 10 |a [UPC code] |b $16.99 |2 upc
040 Cataloguing source – description conventions ## |a UL
082 Dewey Decimal Classification 04 746.028
092 Local call number ## |a M |b 746.028
245 Title statement 00 |a Macramé board |h [realia] |c The BeadSmith |s model number MWB20
245 Title statement 00 |a Macramé board |h [realia] |c The BeadSmith |s model number MWB20
245 Title statement 00 |a Macramé board |h [realia] |c The BeadSmith |s model number MWB20
246 Varying form of title 3# Project board
246 Varying form of title 3# Bead board
264 Production, publication, distribution, manufacture, and copyright notice #3 |a Carteret, NJ : |b The BeadSmith, |c n.d.
300 Physical description ## |a 1 macramé board |c 11.5 x 15.5 in.
336 Content type ## |a three-dimensional form |b tdf |2 rdacontent
337 Media type ## |a unspecified |b z |2 rdamedia
338 Carrier type ## |a object |b nr |2 rdacarrier
500 General note ## |a For use with beading, cording, and macramé supplies.
520 Summary 2# |a Macramé /project board is made of synthetic material which will not be damaged by pins. The board has notches on all sides to hold cords securely in place; ideal for macramé, Shambhala bracelets, decorative knotting and beading, etc. |c [distributor information]
655 Index term – genre/form #0 |a Equipment |x Textile crafts |2 lcsh
852 Location ## |a [Library/Holding Organization’s Name] |b makerspace

 

 

Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering (YouTube)

RDA elements

RDA REF RDA ELEMENT DATA RECORDED
2.3.2 Title proper Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering
2.3.6 Variant title
2.4.2 Statement of responsibility relating to title proper Youth Radio
2.8.2 Place of publication San Bruno, CA
2.8.4 Publisher’s name YouTube
2.8.6 Date of publication May 2012
2.9.4 Distributor’s name
2.11 Copyright date 2012
2.15 Identifier for the manifestation See 4.6
3.2 Media type video
3.3 Carrier type online resource
3.4 Extent 1 online resource (1 video file)
3.5 Dimensions
4.6 Uniform Resource Locator http://youtu.be/WEuTnKHtsDw
3.19.2 Digital file type video file
6.9 Content type two-dimensional moving image
7.23 Performer, narrator, and/or presenter Nolan, Alex
7.23 Performer, narrator, and/or presenter Grayson, Dakila
17.8 Work manifested1 Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering (Online Resource : 2012)
19.2 Creator Youth Radio
18.5 Relationship designator
20.2 Contributor

 

Encoded in the MARC 21 format for bibliographic data, using ISBD punctuation

MARC FIELD TAG MARC FIELD INDICATORS DATA RECORDED
Leader/06 Type of record g
Leader/07 Bibliographic level m
Leader/18 Descriptive cataloguing form i
Leader/19 Multipart resource record level #
007/00 Physical description fixed field – Category of material c
007/01 Physical description fixed field – Specific material designation r
007/04 Physical description fixed field – Configuration of playback channels n
007/06 Physical description fixed field – Dimensions
007/12 Physical description fixed field – Special playback characteristics a
007/13 Physical description fixed field – Capture and storage technique u
008/35-37 Fixed length data elements – Language eng
040 Cataloguing source – description conventions ## a UL |e rda
082 Dewey Decimal Classification Number 04 |a 027.8 |223
110 Main entry – Corporate name
245 Title statement 00 |a Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering. |c Youth Radio.
264 Production, publication, distribution, manufacture, and copyright notice #1 |a [San Bruno, CA] : |b YouTube, |c 2012.
300 Physical description ## |a 1 online resource (1 video file)
336 Content type ## |a two-dimensional moving image |b tdi |2 rdacontent
337 Media type ## |a video |b v |2 rdamedia
338 Carrier type ## |a online resource |b cr |2 rdacarrier
500 General note ## |a Bicycle pump-powered rockets, lunch box speakers, and paper airplanes are just a few of the projects students have tackled in an after school program lead by the DIY company MAKE, which celebrates the “right to tweak, hack, and bend any technology to your will.”For students who participate in the after school program at McClymonds High School in Oakland, Calif., hacking, bending and tweaking translate into hands-on training in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Meeting twice weekly at two hours a pop, students learn soldering, circuits, and basic mechanical systems. Youth Radio spoke with Maker-in-Residence Alex Nolan and junior Dakila Grayson about the benefits of bringing DIY into the classroom.This story is a project of Youth Radio’s New Options Desk, supported by the New Options Project and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
650 Subject Added Entry 14 |a High school libraries |x Activity programs.
650 Subject Added Entry 04 |a Makerspaces.
710 Added entry – Corporate Name 2# |a Youth Radio.
700 Added entry – Personal name 1# |a Grayson, Dakila.
700 Added entry – Personal name 1# |a Nolan, Alex.
852 Location ## |a [Library/Holding Organization’s Name] |b makerspace
856 Electronic Location and Access 40 |u http://youtu.be/WEuTnKHtsDw

Silhouette CAMEO Electronic Cutting Machine

RDA elements

RDA REF RDA ELEMENT DATA RECORDED
2.3.2 Title proper CAMEO Electronic Cutting Machine
2.3.6 Variant title Silhouette CAMEO Electronic Cutting Machine
2.4.2 Statement of responsibility relating to title proper Silhouette America
2.7 Production statement Orem, UT : Silhouette America, 2014
2.13 Mode of issuance single unit
2.15 Identifier for the manifestation [Universal product code]
3.2 Media type other
3.3 Carrier type other
3.4 Extent 1 electronic cutting machine (1 power cable, 1 USB cable, 1 12-inch cutting mat, 1 cutting blade)
3.5 Dimensions 11 X 11 X 24 in.
3.20 Equipment or system requirements Software resides on user’s computer. Continuous internet connection not required.
6.9 Content type other
7.2 Nature of the content The Silhouette CAMEO is an electronic cutting machine that can cut a variety of materials (from vinyl to fabric) up to 12 inches wide and 10 feet long. The model has a responsive touchscreen, a handy on-unit cross cutter, and built in accessory storage. The CAMEO’s Print & Cut feature lets you cut precisely around designs and images you have printed on your home printer.  [from Amazon.com item description]  Located in the makerspace.
17.8 Work manifested CAMEO electronic cutting machine / manufactured by Silhouette America — Model number: 2Web-3T
17.11 Exemplar of a manifestation M 022.9

Encoded in the MARC 21 format for bibliographic data, using ISBD punctuation

MARC FIELD INDICATORS DATA RECORDED
Leader/06 Type of record r
Leader/07 Bibliographic level m
Leader/18 Descriptive cataloguing form i
Leader/19 Multipart resource record level #
007/00 Physical description fixed field – Category of material z
007/01 Physical description fixed field – Specific material designation z
024 Other standard identifier 10 |a [UPC code] |b $299.99 |2 upc
040 Cataloguing source – description conventions ## |a UL
082 Dewey Decimal Classification 04 022.9
092 Local call  number ## |a M |b 022.9
245 Title statement 00 |a CAMEO Electronic Cutting Machine |h [realia] |c Silhouette America |s 2Web-3T
246 Varying form of title 3# |a Silhouette CAMEO
264 Production, publication, distribution, manufacture, and copyright notice #3 |a Orem, UT : |b Silhouette America, |c 2014
300 Physical description ## |a 1 electronic cutting machine |b desktop equipment |c 11 x 11 x 24 in., + |e power cable, USB cable,12-inch cutting mat, cutting blade
336 Content type ## |a three-dimensional form |b tdf |2 rdacontent
337 Media type ## |a other |b x |2 rdamedia
338 Carrier type ## |a object |b nr |2 rdacarrier
500 General note ## |a copy includes user’s manual and custom design software (cataloged separately).
520 Participant or performer note 2# |a The Silhouette CAMEO is an electronic cutting machine that can cut a variety of materials (from vinyl to fabric) up to 12 inches wide and 10 feet long. The model has a responsive touchscreen, a handy on-unit cross cutter, and built in accessory storage. The CAMEO’s Print & Cut feature lets you cut precisely around designs and images you have printed on your home printer. |c [distributor information]
538 System details note ## |a Software resides on user’s computer; continuous internet connection not required.
655 Index term – Genre/form #0 |a Equipment |x Paper work |2 lcsh
852 Location ## |a [Library/Holding Organization’s Name] |b makerspace